REGISTRATION 

Category1 Registration Type Fee
Club Member CSCC Members $150.00 plus applicable taxes
  Non-Members $175.00 plus applicable taxes
Single Roundtable CSCC Members $25.00 plus applicable taxes
  Non-Members $30.00 plus applicable taxes

All CSCC Education Roundtables will be held on Thursdays and will be one (1) hour in length.
Eastern Pacific Mountain Central Atlantic Newfoundland
ON, QC BC AB, SK* MB, ON (West) NB, NS, PE, Lab NL
11:30-12:30 08:30-09:30 09:30-10:30 10:30-11:30 12:30-13:30 13:00-14:00
14:00-15:00 11:00-12:00 12:00-13:00 13:00-1400 15:00-16:00 15:30-16:30
* SK - During daylight savings time; otherwise one hour later

Register HERE Today!

1Save today! Club members are entitled to join any or all of the Roundtables. Register once only and automatically receive an invitation for each Roundtable and access to the slides and recordings of past roundtables for the current year.

  • Registration is by pre-payment only using the online registration form.
  • Each registration is restricted to one (1) phone line; you may have as many participants using that line as you wish.  You are welcome to sign up more than one (1) phone line but each line must be a separate registration and payment. **COVID NOTE** During the pandemic when social distancing rules restrict gatherings, a group registration can apply to multiple lines and all members of the group can log in using their own line. If you are a member of a group please register without making the payment, and indicate your group name in the field provided.
  • Participants will be sent a link to the zoom session.

2022-2023 SCHEDULE

  Date Time (Eastern) Presenter(s) Topic
1.  September 22,2022 11:30  Mary Kathryn Bohn  Reference Interval Harmonization in Canada 
2.  October 6, 2022  14:00  Dana Bailey
Kristin Hauff 
A Debate: The Pros and Cons of Direct-to-Consumer Testing
3. October 20, 2022  11:30  Albert Tsui  New Solutions to Old Problems: A practical approach to identify sample with intravenous contamination in the clinical laboratory
4. November 3, 2022 11:30  Janet Simons  Using Labs Wisely: Next steps and new directions
5. November 17, 2022  14:00 Bruce Lanphear  The Impact of Toxic Chemicals: No Safe Levels?
6. December 15, 2022  11:30 Martha Lyon Clinical Chemistry Challenges in Vulnerable Populations
7. January 19, 2023  11:30  Natalie Landry  Introduction to Machine Learning in the Clinical Laboratory 
8. February 2, 2023  11:30 Adrian Budhram Diagnostic performance of neural antibody testing for autoimmune encephalitis 
9. February 16, 2023  11:30     
10. March 2, 2023  11:30    
11. March 16, 2023  14:00    
12. March 30, 2023  11:30    
13.  April 13, 2023  14:00     
14. April 27, 2023  11:30     
15. May 11, 2023  11:30     
16. May 25, 2023  14:00     

   

#8. Feb. 2, 2023 Diagnostic performance of neural antibody testing for autoimmune encephalitis
Speaker:  Adrian Budhram, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Western University 
Overview:  Neural antibodies serve as helpful diagnostic biomarkers of autoimmune encephalitis, a potentially devastating yet treatable neurologic disease. As accessibility to neural antibody testing has increased, so too have evaluations of test diagnostic performance. We herein discuss the clinical sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of neural antibody testing for autoimmune encephalitis, with the aim of improving test implementation and interpretation in clinical practice. 
Objectives:  At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
1) Describe clinical sensitivity, specificity and predictive value of diagnostic testing
2) Discuss key considerations of these diagnostic test measures pertaining to neural antibody testing for autoimmune encephalitis
3) Highlight ways to optimize the diagnostic performance of neural antibody testing for autoimmune encephalitis in clinical practice 
#7 Jan. 19, 2023 Introduction to Machine Learning in the Clinical Laboratory
Speaker: Natalie Landry, Clinical Biochemistry Fellow, University of Manitoba
Overview:  Machine Learning is a type of Artifical Intelligence (AI) which enables computer programs to learn and infer from data inputs without continuous human programming.  This powerful tool can be used to predict, classify, and estimate outcomes from large datasets which would otherwise be too unwieldy to analyze.  As demand for laboratory services continues to increase, and the data generated follows suit, the potential for Machine Learning in the clinical laboratory is certainly appealing.  This presentation will serve as a broad review of the types of Machine Learning algorithms and their potential application to improve clinical, analytical, and operational processes in the laboratory.
Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  define and identify sources of "Big Data"
2)  compare and contrast the 4 main categories of Machine Learning algorithms
3)  recognize the types of problems in the clinical laboratory that can be addressed using Machine Learning.
#6 Dec. 15, 2022 Clinical Chemistry Challenges in Vulnerable Populations
Speaker:  Martha E. Lyon, Laboratory Director, Clinical Biochemistry, Kenora Rainy River Regional Laboratory Program
Overview:  Several challenges have been identified with the provision of clinical chemistry services for vulnerable patient populations.  In 2018, the Canadian Medical Association Journal added vulnerable populations as an area to champion in this journal.  The term "vulnerable", while not well defined in health care, has been used to justify the allocation of additional resources but it can also lead to the negative consequence of stigmatization.  Neonatal/pediatric as well as LGBTQ+ populations have been identified as vulnerable populations in health care.  In this seminar, several of the challenges in delivering clinical chemistry services for these patient populations will be discussed. 
Objectives:  At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  describe the concept of vulnerable populations in healthcare
2)  recognize the impact of choice of language when describing vulnerable populations
3)  discuss challenges affecting delivery of clinical chemistry service for pediatric/neonatal and transgender patients.
#5. Nov. 17, 2022 The Impact of Toxic Chemicals: No Safe Levels?
Speaker:  Bruce Lanphear, MD, MPH, Professor, Simon Fraser University 
Overview:  For extensively-studied toxic chemicals – like lead, air pollution, and benzene – scientists have found that the risk of death, disease or disability rises sharply, beginning at the lowest measurable concentrations. These findings, which conflict with how agencies regulate chemicals, indicate that the contribution of toxic chemicals to chronic disease is grossly underestimated. If no threshold exists for widely disseminated toxic chemicals, we will need to achieve near-zero levels to protect people and laboratories will need to measure concentrations of toxic chemicals in blood and other body fluids in parts per billion or lower. 
Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  Be familiar with three or more chemicals that are toxic at low levels of exposure
2)  Appreciate the growing importance of laboratory technology to measure chemicals in blood and other body fluids in the parts per billion. 
#4. Nov. 3, 2022 Using Labs Wisely: Next steps and new directions
Speaker: Dr. Janet Simons, Medical Biochemist, Providence Health Care, BC
Oveerview: An overview of the national Using Labs Wisely initiative, of which many CSCC members are already participants. Followed by a discussion of the next steps that labs may take if they are already engaged in resource utilization initiatives, including new lab test targets and approaches. 
Objectives At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  Discuss common barriers to lab-lead utilization initiatives
2)  Identify potential new targets for quality improvement 
#3. Oct. 20, 2022 New Solutions to Old Problems: A practical approach to identify sample with intravenous contamination in the clinical laboratory
Speaker: Albert Tsui, Clinical Biochemist, Alberta Precision Laboratories
Overview: Contamination with intravenous (IV) fluids is a common cause of specimen rejection in hospital labs. The impact of missed contaminated samples can lead to false elevation or reduction of laboratory results, leading to misdiagnosis and mismanagement of patient care. Identification of contaminated samples can be challenging and usually rely on common sense and experience. Internal laboratory measures such as failed delta checks and instrument errors may not be sensitive and specific enough. This presentation will highlight the current gaps to identify contaminated samples and describe an approach to identify these samples.
Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
1) Outline various approaches in the literature to identify specimens with fluid contamination
2) Describe the considerations to develop, verify, implement and optimize algorithm to identify fluid contamination
#2, Oct. 6, 2022 A Debate: The Pros and Cons of Direct-to-Consumer Testing 
Speakers:  Dana Bailey, Clinical Chemist, Dynacare 
Kristin Hauff, Clinical Biochemist, Interior Health
  During this presentation, we will debate the pros (Dana Bailey) and cons (Kristin Hauff) of direct-to-consumer (DTC) testing. Through the debate, we will highlight the current landscape and future projections of DTC testing, the advantages and limitations of DTC testing, and the role the laboratory may play in supporting or limiting DTC testing. In total, we will strive to answer the question whether DTC testing represents a tidal shift within the healthcare industry, or a passing trend. 
  At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  Describe the current landscape and future projections of direct to consumer testing in North America
2)  Outline the benefits of direct to consumer testing
3)  Outline the concerns with direct to consumer testing, and how to mitigate potential risks. 
#1. Sept. 22, 2022  Reference Interval Harmonization in Canada 
Speaker: Mary Kathryn Bohn, PhD Candidate, The Hospital for Sick Children/University of Toronto
Overview: Harmonization in laboratory medicine from specimen collection to result reporting is critical to ensure consistent and accurate clinical decision-making. There is currently unnecessary variation in reference intervals (RIs) reported to patient charts in laboratories across Canada for assays with established analytical traceability. This webinar will discuss the big data analytics approach developed by the Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists (CSCC) Working Group on Reference Interval Harmonization (hRI-WG) to derive common reference ranges across populations and testing platforms followed by an interactive discussion on implementation.
Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
•  Outline the major gaps in reference intervals and the critical need for harmonization across clinical laboratories.
•  Describe the major advances made by the CSCC Working Group on Reference Interval Harmonization.
•  Discuss the development and verification of common reference intervals and their implementation across Canada.