CSCC EDUCATION ROUNDTABLES

2016-2017 WEBINAR SERIES

All CSCC Education Roundtables will be held on Thursdays and will be one (1) hour in length.

Location Local Time
NL Newfoundland and Labrador 1300
NB, NS New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island 1230
ON, QC Ontario, Quebec 1130
MB Manitoba 1030
AB, SK* Alberta, Saskatchewan 0930
BC British Columbia 0830
* SK - 0930 during daylight savings time; otherwise 1030

REGISTRATION:

  • Participation is by pre-payment only using the
  • Each registration can be used for one (1) phone line.  You may have as many participants at that one phone line as you wish.
  • You can register for the entire series (Club member) or for a single roundtable.
  • Participants will be sent a 1-800 phone number for the audio and an internet url to view the slides.


PD CREDITS:

During the Roundtable a 'CE code' will be displayed which you should record. 

Members:

  • Login to the website and go to 'CE Code Entry' under Membership Tools. 
  • Enter the code and follow the instructions to enter the credit into your PD records and if you wish, print a certificate of attendance.


Non-Members
:

  • Go to the CSCC website www.cscc.ca and enter the page 'Non-Member Certificates', under Conferences /Events. 
  • Enter the CE Code and follow the instructions to print a certificate of attendance to use for your claims. 


HOW TO ACCESS PREVIOUS EDUCATION ROUNDTABLES:

Current year: 

  • Only those who have paid for the current series may access the previous roundtables in that series. 
  • Log in, go to CONFERENCES / EVENTS and hover over the Education Roundtables menu item and the Archived Roundtables menu will fly out to the right. 


Previous years: 

  • Available to all members in good standing. 
  • Log in, go to Archived Roundtables & Lectureships in the Membership Tools menu on the left.

 


2016-2017 SCHEDULE

 

Date

Presenter(s)

Topic

1 September 22, 2016 Matthew Henderson Acute Porphyrias: Test Selection and Interpretation
2 October 13, 2016 PC Chan & Yu Chen Developing Recommendations and Consensus on the Reporting of SPE Patterns in the Absence of a Discernible M-band
3 October 27, 2016 Chris McCudden Kidney Failure Risk Equations: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
4 November 10, 2016 Cristiana Stefan Medical Cannabis: Ethical, legal and medical debates
5 November 24, 2016 Khosrow Adeli &
David Seccombe
National Survey of Laboratory Reference Intervals Across Canada: A Report of the CSCC Working Group on Reference Interval Harmonization
6 December 8, 2016 Cancelled
7 January 12, 2017 Ron Schifman Utilization Management
8 January 26, 2017 Philip Devereaux Cardiovascular Disease Lectureship, sponsored by Alere
9 February 9, 2017 Michael Cornes Harmonizing Pre-analytical Laboratory Practices - European progress by the EFLM WG-PRE
10 February 23, 2017 Alan Wu Critical Care Lectureship, sponsored by Instrumentation Laboratory
11 March 9, 2017 Andrew Don-Wauchope Is There Purpose to Clinical Practice Guidelines in Laboratory Medicine?
Recommended pre-read
12 March 23, 2017 Angela C. Cheung Immunoglobulin G Subclasses
13 April 13, 2017 Nicolas Tétrault Genetic Testing: Current use, perspectives and pitfalls
14 April 27, 2017 Jim Januzzi NTproBNP/BNP
15 May 11, 2017 Danielle Freedman UK Minimum Retesting Intervals Guidelines
16 May 25, 2017 Raffick Bowen The Cost of Quality: A Laboratorian's Perspective

#16
May 25, 2017
The Cost of Quality: A Laboratorian's Perspective
Speakers:
Dr. Raffick Bowen, Stanford Healthcare
Description: Quality, or the lack of quality, affects a clinical laboratory from supplier to patient.  A successful quality strategy starts with a clinical laboratory culture that fosters quality, followed by an understanding of the principles of quality and engaging and empowering employees in the necessary activities to implement quality.  When these things are done well, the clinical laboratory typically satisfies its suppliers and patients and obtains a competitive and reputational advantage.  The concept of quality costs (COQ) was first described by Joseph M. Juran in 1951.  Most clinical laboratories are not aware of their quality costs because it is not collected.  However, with information technologies, identifying, and monitoring quality costs is easier and can have a significant impact on improving quality and reducing costs. 
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  describe the different categories of cost of quality (COQ) with respect to the clinical laboratory;
2)  identify some examples of each type of quality costs in the clinical laboratory;
3)  discuss how to reduce specific COQ categories to decrease costs and increase the value of the clinical laboratory and ultimately improve patient care and safety.
 
#15
May 11, 2017
Genetic Testing: Current use, perspectives and pitfalls
Speakers:
Nicolas Tétrault
Description:  
Learning Objectives:  
 
#14
April 27, 2017
Coming Soon!
Speakers:
 
Description:  
Learning Objectives:  
 
#13
April 13, 2017
Coming Soon!
Speakers:
 
Description:  
Learning Objectives:  
 
#12
March 23, 2017
Immunoglobulin G Subclasses
Speakers:
Dr. Angela Cheung, Research Fellow, Mayo Clinic
Description: The presentation will discuss the relevant structural and functional differences in immunoglobulin G subclasses, as well as the challenges inherent in their measurement. The talk will also include a general discussion about the clinical relevance of abnormal immunoglobulin G subclass levels, with pertinent guidelines. 
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session the participants will be able to:
1)  understand the challenges in immunoglobulin G subclass measurement and quantification
2)  recognize the clinical relevance of disturbances in immunoglobulin G subclass levels
3)  consider whether or not immunoglobulin G subclass testing should be performed locally. 
 
#11
March 9, 2017
Is There Purpose to Clinical Practice Guidelines in Laboratory Medicine?
Speakers:
Andrew Don-Wauchope, VP Clinical Services, LifeLabs, Hamilton ON
Description: Recommended pre-read

Clinical Practice Guidelines have been provided for a number of years. These are most often focused on clinical questions and the use of medications but often include recommendations about laboratory diagnostic tests. Evidence based (laboratory) medicine remains a high priority. However, we often do not pay enough attention to the detail and accept poor guidelines as standard practice. This presentation will discuss the means to appraise guidelines, the GRADE system and help you work out how you can best apply the clinical practice guideline to you situation. This is the fundamental principal of the guideline – guidance, not standard of practice.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
1)   understand why guidelines are produced
2)  know the name of one tool to appraise guidelines
3)  be able to identify GRADE scoring when reading a guideline
4)  know that you need to apply a guideline to your practice.
 
#10
February 23, 2017
CSCC Lectureship on Critical Care Medicine sponsored by Instrumentation Laboratory
Speakers:
Alan H.B. Wu, Ph.D., Professor, UCSF School of Medicine, Laboratory Medicine, San Francisco CA 
Description: https://cscc.ca/en/conferences/2017-cscc-lectureship-on-critical-care-medicine.html 
 
#9
February 9, 2017
Harmonizing Pre-Analytical Laboratory Practices - European progress by the EFLM WG-PRE
Speakers:
Dr. Mike Cornes, Consultant Clinical Scientist, Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust
Description: The presentation will discuss the need for harmonization of the pre-analytical phase and how interest in this area has grown.  It will then go on to discuss what people in Europe view as the most critical aspect of the pre-analytical phase to be standardized.  I will then show data of what has been achieved in Europe, in particularly by the EFLM WG-PRE, and what is planned for the future. 
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  understand what is meant by the pre-analytical phase;
2)  have a knowledge of the current situation in Europe;
3)  take away some tools and ideas on how standardisation can be achieved.
 
#8
January 26, 2017
CSCC Lectureship on Cardiovascular Disease sponsored by Alere
Speakers:
 Philip Devereaux
Description:  https://cscc.ca/en/conferences/2017-lectureship-on-cardiovascular-disease.html
 
 #7
January 12, 2017
Utilization Management
Speakers:
Ron Schifman
Description: Inappropriate use of laboratory tests is common, well recognized, and complex. It can be challenging to identify reasons for misutilization, evaluate the scope of the problem, and find solutions for improvement. This presentation will review the sources for over- and underutilization of laboratory tests, explain methods to evaluate inappropriate practices, and offer guidance about practical strategies and interventions for improvements. Discussion will include information about what causes misutilization of laboratory tests, methods for assessment, and actions that add value to laboratory services by facilitating improvements in testing practices for their clinical setting. 
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  describe current test utilization practices
2)  utilize information systems for test utilization improvement
3)  apply interventional strategies to improve test ordering practices
4)  evaluate the effectiveness of various strategies and interventions used to improve test utilization.
 
#5
November 24, 2016
National Survey of Laboratory Reference Intervals Across Canada: A Report of the CSCC Working Group on Reference Interval Harmonization
Speakers:
Khosrow Adeli, Head and Professor, The Hospital of Sick Children, University of Toronto
David Seccombe, Managing Director, CEQAL, Vancouver
Description: The CSCC working group on reference interval harmonization was formed in 2015 to a) review adult and pediatric reference intervals currently in use in clinical laboratories across Canada, b) assess the available evidence on reference values obtained in a priori studies of healthy populations in Canada and other countries, and c) develop appropriate recommendations and guidelines on the use of harmonized reference intervals across Canada. A national survey was conducted in April/May of this year to collect data from laboratories for 7 common clinical chemistry analytes. In the current presentation, I will review the survey data demonstrating a considerable variation in both adult and pediatric reference intervals currently being used by clinical laboratories across the country. Will as significant discordance with currently recommended reference intervals by CALIPER, CHMS, as well as UK and Australian harmonization initiatives. 
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
1) Appreciate the current variation in adult and pediatric reference intervals currently in use in Canadian laboratories.
2) Understand the need for evidence-based reference interval data obtained in healthy populations .
3) Appreciate the importance of harmonized reference intervals at least for laboratories using the same analytical platforms. 
 
#4
November 10, 2016
Medical Cannabis: Ethical, legal and medical debates
Speakers:
Dr. Christiana Stefan, Laboratory Director, Clinical Biochemist/Toxicologist, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto
Description: This presentation is an introduction to the complex topic of the Cannabis (whole plant or derivatives) use for medical care. Legal, ethical and medical debates on the subject are stronger than ever, including in Canada. The topic is multifaceted and diverse players (government, scientists, physicians) need to come together to identify resolutions for current medical pressures at the patient level while addressing a number of public health concerns.  Hospitals have implemented or are in the process of implementing policies around Medical Cannabis use on hospital premises taking into account the existing provincial and/or federal legislation. A direct role for the Clinical Laboratories has not been directly addressed, but it can be anticipated particularly in the areas of TDM and Clinical Toxicology. 
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
1)   Appreciate the origins of the medical use of the Cannabis plant and its impact on scientific research
2)  Comprehend the current status of the cannabinoids-based pharmaceuticals and their limitations
3)  Realize the complexity of the ethical and legal context surrounding the use of the cannabis plant or derivatives for medical care
4)  Anticipate the role of the Clinical Laboratories particularly in the TDM and Clinical Toxicology areas
 
#3

Kidney Failure Risk Equations: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly
Speakers:
Christopher McCudden, Ph.D., DABCC, FACB, FCACB, Clinical Biochemist, The Eastern Ontario Regional Laboratory Association 
Description: This presentation will describe the epidemiology of end stage renal disease, equations used to predict kidney failure, and limitations of those equations. 
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  describe the Kidney Failure Risk Equation (KFRE)
2)  describe how the KFRE is used
3)  explain the limitations of the equation
4)  identify options to improve reporting of kidney failure risk.
 
#2
October 13, 2016
Developing Recommendations and Consensus on the Reporting of SPE Patterns in the Absence of a Discernible M-band
Speakers:
PC Chan, Clinical Biochemist, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto ON; &
Yu Chen, Chief, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Dr. Everett Chalmers Regional Hospital, Fredericton NB
Description:

Clinical serum protein electrophoresis (SPE) is a well-known technique that separates serum proteins into 5-6 fractions or zones, and serves primarily for detecting and quantifying monoclonal immunoglobulins (M-proteins). However, the reporting of serum protein patterns and their associate (presumptive) clinical conditions, particularly in the absence of a visible M-protein, has been controversial.

Based on a recent Canada-wide practice survey sanctioned by the MGIG, the SPE reporting practice was highly variable, despite the availability of consensus guidelines(1). The current working group of MGIG sought evidence, if any, supporting these practices through literature reviews and laboratory audits. Three fundamental questions were asked:
1. Does a particular protein pattern reliably predict a clinical/disease condition?
2. Is this patterm-inferred condition related to a monoclonal gammopathy?
3. Does the identification of this pattern-inferred condition(s) result in improved detection of monoclonal gammopathies e.g. through further investigations? 

Learning Objectives:

At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
1) Appraise the evidence, or a lack of it, in supporting the reporting of some common protein patterns in the absence of a discernible M-protein, and
2) Understand the rationale behind the recommendations proposed by the working group.
3) Consider changing their current laboratory practice to align with the recommendations. 

 
#1
September 22, 2016
Acute Porphyrias: Test Selection and Interpretation
Speakers:
Matthew P.A. Henderson, PhD, FCACB, Clinical Biochemist, The Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa ON
Description: The porphyrias are a group of metabolic disorders that result from partial deficiencies of enzymes required for heme biosynthesis. The biochemical investigation of porphyrias has a long history and is a good example of the value of biochemical analysis in genetic disease.  Periodically biochemists are required to assist in test selection for investigation of suspected porphyrias and interpret the results of porphyria testing. This presentation will provide an overview of the porphyias and focus on test selection and interpretation in suspected acute prophyrias. 
Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
1)  cite a brief review of heme biosynthesis
2)  identify test selection in suspected acute porphyrias
3)  describe an approach for biochemical differentiation of acute porphyrias